Memory loss has been a subject that many readers have written to me about over the past couple of months,  Most discovered during a holiday visit with a parent or grandparent that their loved one was "more forgetful", "less engaged" and "more fearful" than their last visit home.  Several of my readers asked for advice about lessening the fear and confusion associated with doctor's visits or medical procedures.  

One of my LinkedIn friends is Viki Kind. She is the author of The Caregiver's Path to Compassionate Decision Making.  I found this advice on her website and I thought I would share it with you.CARGIVER'S PATH TO COMPASSIONATE DECISION MAKING
When a person with Alzheimer’s or dementia is going to have a medical test or procedure, how can we help the person to feel less frightened and to minimize any suffering? If the patient is struggling to understand what will be happening to them, do a practice run-through and show the person the room where the test will happen. Or find a book with pictures that will help him understand what you are talking about. If the person with diminished capacity is afraid of being alone, you may want to introduce him to the nurses who will be working that day. For my dad, we tape-recorded the doctor’s explanations so he could listen to the information over and over again until he felt more comfortable.

Another thing to keep in mind is that the patient may be experiencing symptoms that affect his or her participation. These symptoms could be pain, side effects of medications, loss of hearing or sight, lack of sleep, an undiagnosed illness and grief, to name a few. Find out what can be done to relieve these symptoms to make it easier for the individual to participate in the process. Ultimately, our goal is to think about the quality-of-life questions from the person’s perspective as he or she will experience the consequences of our decisions.

Members of our household found Jean Carper's recent book (based on UCLA studies), "100 Simple Things You Can Do to Prevent Alzheimer's" encouraging.  We have long known that the Baby Boomers fear Alzheimers more than any other malady and have felt helpless in its wake.  As a group we like control and Jean has given us some ways in which we can take matters into our own hands.   Here are five things you can do now to help save your child (or grandchild) from Alzheimer's and memory loss later in life, according to the latest research.

1. Prevent head blows: Insist your child wear a helmet during biking, skating,
skiing, baseball, football, hockey, and all contact sports. A major blow as well
as tiny repetitive unnoticed concussions can cause damage, leading to memory loss and Alzheimer's years later.

2 Encourage language skills: A teenage girl who is a superior writer is eight
times more likely to escape Alzheimer's in late life than a teen with poor
linguistic skills. Teaching young children to be fluent in two or more languages
makes them less vulnerable to Alzheimer's.

3. Insist your child go to college: Education is a powerful Alzheimer's deterrent. The more years of formal schooling, the lower the odds. Most Alzheimer's prone: teenage drop outs. For each year of education, your risk of dementia drops 11%, says a recent University of Cambridge study. ( use your imagination more - stop so much TV )

4. Provide stimulation: Keep your child's brain busy with physical, mental and
social activities and novel experiences. All these contribute to a bigger,
better functioning brain with more so-called 'cognitive reserve.' High cognitive
reserve protects against memory decline and Alzheimer's.

5. Spare the junk food: Lab animals raised on berries, spinach and high omega-3 fish have great memories in old age. Those overfed sugar, especially high fructose in soft drinks, saturated fat and trans fats become overweight and diabetic, with smaller brains and impaired memories as they age, a prelude to Alzheimer's.

Don't be afraid - be proactive for you and everyone you love,

Excerpted from Jean Carper's newest book:
"100 Simple Things You Can Do to Prevent Alzheimer's"

I never burned a bra, the underwires were so hard to light with a Bic but I have quietly fought against the glass ceiling for all of my adult life.  I remember in my early career complaining to management that the other executive at my level was male and made 40% more than I.  The boss looked stunned at my ignorance when he responded flippantly, “Well of course he does, he’s a guy”.  Laws were there to protect me at the time.  But I feared losing my job and being tainted for future opportunities.  I stayed on and I’ve done OK. 

I’m not a rabid Hillary Clinton fan.  She angered me when she tried to make health care mandatory for all part-time employees back in the 90’s and I was a struggling business owner.   Her plan would have put me out of business.  But I found the March 14th Newsweek article, The Hillary Doctrine most compelling particularly side-bar Gender Matrix.

Here are some of the facts assembled by or extrapolated from the data collected by the World Economic Forum: 

  1. Educating a girl one year beyond the national average boosts her earning power between 10 and 20 percent
  2.  Countries with higher levels of female secondary-school enrollment have lower infant mortality, lower rates of HIV and AIDS infection, and better child nutrition.
  3. The WEF 2011 Gender Gap Index shows that a nation’s prosperity correlates with the level of parity between women and men (in education, health, economic opportunity, and political empowerment).   Countries with the smallest gaps in 2010 were Iceland, Norway and Finland.  Pakistan, Chad and Yeman had the largest.
  4. According to the WEF, the U.S. could boost its GDP by as much as 9 percent by putting more women in leadership positions in business and government and working harder to correct pay inequities.
  5. Women still only earn 77% of their male counterparts for equal work.
  6. In the Asia-Pacific region, countries are losing between $42 billion and $46 billion a year, according to the WEF by restricting women’s access to the workforce.
  7. When women earn their own money, they spend on their families at more than twice the rate of men.
  8. Worldwide, companies perform better and produce better ideas when their highest ranks have gender diversity.
  9. And from another source:  The first woman to rule a country as an elected leader in the modern era was   Bandaranaike of Sri Lanka, who was elected as prime minister of the island nation in 1960 and later re-elected in 1970.    It is interesting that Sri Lanka ranked ahead of the U.S. in the 2010 WEF analysis.
  10. And from my own personal experience:  Women with whom I have worked are frequently more tactile (feelers), men more visual or auditory.  Decisions that are made with the input of both genders and several generations tend to be more thoughtful, fair and enduring.

Please share your thoughts with me..



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